Student Accountability Studies

Due May 4 University of Phoenix 

Name:  John Reafleng

Student Accountability

To complete this worksheet, find the Concept Cases listed at the end of each chapter in Ch. 5–11 ofBuilding Classroom Discipline. Choose the case most similar to your own situation and answer the question that follows the case. For each case, also include a technique you might use to hold the students accountable. You must respond to one case from each chapter.

Chapter:        5

Case Number and Title:   Case 3: Joshua Clowns and Intimidates

Question:  Joshua, larger and louder than his classmates, always wants to be the center of attention, which he accomplishes through a combination of clowning and intimidation. He makes wise remarks, talks back (smilingly) to the teacher, utters a variety of sound-effect noises such as automobile crashes and gunshots, and makes limitless sarcastic comments and put-downs of his classmates. Other students will not stand up to him, apparently fearing his size and verbal aggression. His teacher, Miss Pearl, has come to her wit’s end. Would Joshua’s behavior be likely to improve if Ronald Morrish’s techniques were used in Miss Pearl’s classroom? Explain.

Answer to question:

Miss Pearl needs to require appropriate behavior of Joshua.  It is possible that, while she is managing her classroom well under Morrish’s definition, she may not have fully implemented Real Discipline, at least not for her most troubling student.  Miss Pearl may have been reluctant to address many of his smaller behaviors and now does not know how to react to his larger challenges.  She should focus on positive aspects of his behavior and start each new day fresh so that she does not begin to feel resentment towards the student.  She needs to make sure that the student has been taught the rules about the behavior that he is exhibiting.  In the moment, Morrish would have the student state: “we don’t speak that way, start over”  Morrish would have Miss Pearl have Joshua write a letter as a means of compensation to those that he bullies as a consequence.  He may also require an improvement plan to track his progress.  If all of the above fail, Morrish concedes that a punishment, suspension from class/school, etc. may to needed to sent a message that ‘no means no’.

Morrish:  “students are not mature enough to make decisions responsibly. As a consequence, teachers waste large amounts of time negotiating and haggling with students about behavior in school. Morrish provides a remedy for this situation. He asks teachers to begin by helping students do two things: (1) differentiate between right and wrong and (2) comply with adult authority. Later, when they became mature enough, students are invited to participate in class decision making.”

Your technique for student accountability:

I concur with how Morrish may handle the above case as I interpret it.  I would expand on the restorative justice consequence to include  restauritive circles and other RJ techniques.  Morrish does not address what the response to behavior would be if what is said cannot be better stated in another, or if the offending student throws or hits. etc.  I interrupt the offending behavior and ask the student to meet me at the door.  We review the expectations and I ask the student if she or he understands them (any why they are important – I’m working on this one).  I then ask that they do or say something positive  wither at the door or upon returning to their seat.

Chapter:       6

Case Number and Title:  Case 2: Sara Will Not Stop Talking

Question:  Sara is a pleasant girl who participates in class activities and does most, though not all, of her assigned work. She cannot seem to refrain from talking to classmates, however. Her teacher, Mr. Gonzales, has to speak to her repeatedly during lessons, to the point that he often becomes exasperated and loses his temper. What suggestions would Harry and Rosemary Wong give Mr. Gonzales for dealing with Sara?

Answer to question:

Wong would make sure that Sara understands the rules about talking in class by making sure that she has been taught them.  Wong would also let her know that rules are limits on behavior, not guidelines.  He also would have the teacher attach consequences to these limits when violated.  Mr. Gonzales should think about his classroom rules, and if talking in class has been specifically addressed and taught to the students.  Under Wong, Mr. Gonzales is free to choose the consequences and discipline plan that he feels are appropriate.  Wong would encourage Mr. Gonzales to be consistent in his discipline.

“The Wongs get their points across through pithy aphorisms, such as the following:

  • The main problem in teaching is not poor discipline, but poor classroom management.
  • Responsibilities clarify what everyone is supposed to do.
  • Effective teachers spend most of the first two weeks teaching students to follow classroom procedures.
  • What you do on the first day of school determines your success for the rest of the year.”
Your technique for student accountability:

If Sara were my student, I would see that she is doing most of her work, yet she still has time to talk in class.  What she is telling me  is that  she needs more challenging work.  I would sit down with her and explain that I will be differentiating instruction to meet her higher level.  Because she is high-functioning academically, I have confidence that she can expect more out of herself.  (I would only make it a little bit more challenging).

If she continued to talk, I would first make sure that she understood the rule about talking in class (because I specifically taught it to the class, but it in the syllabus and asked her and her family to sign it).  Then, using a Real Discipline approach, I would interrupt the behavior and, without a warning, would say to her: “I hear you talking in class when we should be working, so please come and talk to me at the door.”  We will review expectations and I will ask her to return to seat, showing the proper behavior.

If she continues to talk, she will come in a lunch/after school to do any classwork not done as a result of her talking in class.

Chapter:          7

Case Number and Title:    Case 3: Joshua Clowns and Intimidates

Question:  Joshua, larger and louder than his classmates, always wants to be the center of attention, which he accomplishes through a combination of clowning and intimidation. He makes wise remarks, talks back (smilingly) to the teacher, utters a variety of sound-effect noises such as automobile crashes and gunshots, and makes limitless sarcastic comments and put-downs of his classmates. Other students will not stand up to him, apparently fearing his size and verbal aggression. His teacher, Miss Pearl, has come to her wit’s end. What specifically do you find in Fred Jones’s suggestions that would help Miss Pearl with Joshua?

Answer to question:

Misbehavior in most classrooms consists mainly of student passivity, general aimlessness, and massive time wasting. These discipline problems are best resolved by teaching in ways that keep students attentive and responsibly involved in the classroom. Jones advises teachers to use four major teaching strategies: Say, See, Do teaching; working the crowd; using body language effectively; and promoting responsibility through incentive systems. He also emphasizes the value of visual instructional plans, preferred activity time, and providing help efficiently. In short, set limits; enforce them through rules and body language; use Say, See, Do teaching; work the crowd; and provide help and incentives efficiently.

Jones would have Joshua earn incentives for displaying appropriate behavior.  This could be PAT, reward tokens redeemable for prizes, or other items based on student interest.  Of course he first needs to have been taught the rules that he is violating through his behavior so that he knows that he is working for.  The teacher may want to have a class meeting to discuss rules around disrespectful behavior, and have all students, including Joshua, give input.  This rule would then be publish in the classroom.   In the moment of rule violation, the teacher will use proximity and body language she she sees an infraction to not draw attention to the behavior, which may inadvertently reinforce it.

Jones also has Joshua with preferential seating.  Jones states the importance of a ‘backup system’ for when Joshua defies a limit set by a teacher, but does not provide specific strategies.  The teacher needs to make sure that her lessons for fully engaging all students.

If Joshua were my student, I would use a reward system only as a last resort.  I agree with Morrish that rewards may ultimately only reward the negative behaviors.  I would make sure that my lessons are engaging, to include Joshua.  He will have preferential seating, but where I place him.  I normally don’t negotiate rules, but I may make an exception for this case so that all students are invested in respectful behavior.  If I can interrupt a behavior prior to it significantly violating a rule, I will use body language and proximity.  Otherwise i will ask the student to meet me at the door to discuss.  No warnings will be given (well, ideally).  I then ask that they do or say something positive  wither at the door or upon returning to their seat.  Restorative justice methods may be used.

Chapter:         8

Case Number and Title:   Case 4: Tom is Hostile and Defiant

Question:  Tom has appeared to be in his usual foul mood ever since arriving in class. On his way to sharpen his pencil, he bumps into Frank, who complains. Tom tells him loudly to shut up. Miss Baines, the teacher, says, “Tom, go back to your seat.” Tom wheels around, swears loudly, and says heatedly, “I’ll go when I’m damned good and ready!” How would Glasser have Miss Baines deal with Tom?

Answer to question:

Glasser would caution Miss Baines to not have a knee-jerk reaction to Tom’s behavior.  She should ask as cited in our text: “ It looks like you have a problem, Jonathan. How can I help you solve it?”  The teacher is not looking to place blame, or enact punitive measures.  Her relationship with the students is of paramount performance, treating both students with respect.  The teacher could also use appropriate humor to diffuse the situation (depending on the comfort level of humor use by the teacher).  For the future, the teacher would help to develop the seven connecting habits: caring, listening, supporting, contributing, encouraging, trusting, and befriending with her students.

“Glasser, one of the greatest educational thinkers of our time, contends that behavior in school will not improve until we change the way we work with students. It has become clear, he says, that trying to force students to learn or behave responsibly is hopeless. Schools would do far better if they emphasized three things that have been shown to produce the results we want: (1) provide a curriculum that is genuinely attractive to students, (2) use non-coercive discipline to help students make responsible choices that lead to personal success, and (3) strongly emphasize quality in all aspects of teaching and learning.”

Your technique for student accountability:

In my work with the most troubled/traumatized students, classroom conflicts had lead to unfortunate consequences if coercive methods are utilized.  Using glasser’s “How can I help you” model, with humor can defuse the situation and allow for processing and working on the seven connecting habits.

Chapter:          9

Case Number and Title:   Case 3: Joshua Clowns and Intimidates

Question:  Joshua, larger and louder than his classmates, always wants to be the center of attention, which he accomplishes through a combination of clowning and intimidation. He makes wise remarks, talks back (smilingly) to the teacher, utters a variety of sound-effect noises such as automobile crashes and gunshots, and makes limitless sarcastic comments and put-downs of his classmates. Other students will not stand up to him, apparently fearing his size and verbal aggression. His teacher, Miss Pearl, has come to her wit’s end. Would Joshua’s behavior be likely to improve if Win-Win Discipline were used in Miss Pearl’s classroom? Explain.

Answer to question:

Glasser would advise Ms. Pearl to ask the student what his behavior would look like if he were making the best decisions.  Future work will focus on creating collaborative solutions.  One possible end result could be a negotiated rule about disrespectful behaviors towards others.

“Three pillars of Win-Win Discipline.Three pillars comprise the philosophical structure of Win-Win Discipline: (1) same side, meaning students, teachers, and parents all work together on the same side to enhance the school experience for everyone; (2) collaborative solutions, meaning students and teachers cooperate in proposing workable solutions to discipline problems; and (3) learned responsibility, the desire to behave appropriately, which students acquire by practicing self-management and the skills of getting along with others.

Class rules.Win-Win Discipline makes use of class rules, but they are not formulated solely by the teacher. Rather, they are class agreements worked out cooperatively by teacher and students. Rules (agreements) should be worded simply, limited to about five”

Your technique for student accountability:

If Joshua were my student, I would interrupt the behavior.  Using the Glasser model, I would work towards a collaborative solution to meet the needs of Joshua, the other students and me. Though I normally don’t negotiate rules, but I may make an exception for this case so that all students are invested in respectful behavior.  If I can interrupt a behavior prior to it significantly violating a rule, I will use body language and proximity.  Otherwise i will ask the student to meet me at the door to discuss.  No warnings will be given (well, ideally).  I then ask that they do or say something positive  wither at the door or upon returning to their seat.  Restorative justice methods may be used.

Chapter:       10

Case Number and Title:   Case 2: Sara Will Not Stop Talking

Question:  Sara is a pleasant girl who participates in class activities and does most, though not all, of her assigned work. She cannot seem to refrain from talking to classmates, however. Her teacher, Mr. Gonzales, speaks to her repeatedly during lessons, to the point that he often becomes exasperated and loses his temper. What suggestions would Marvin Marshall give Mr. Gonzales for dealing with Sara?

Answer to question:

Marshall would recommend using facial expression, eye contact, and proximity to interrupt the behavior.  The teacher will then check for understanding.  Guided choice to allow for reflection on the behavior, without using coercion to have students be accountable for their behavior.

Marvin Marshall believes the best way to ensure good classroom behavior is to help students learn to conduct themselves responsibly. For Marshall, one of today’s most influential authorities in discipline,responsibility is another word for internal motivation to do the right thing. Teachers can activate that motivation, he says, by (1) articulating clear behavioral expectations, (2)empowering students to reach them, (3) infusing positivity into all aspects of teaching, and (4) promoting a desire to do the right thinginstead of pushing for obedience.

Your technique for student accountability:

If Sara were my student, I would see that she is doing most of her work, yet she still has time to talk in class.  What she is telling me  is that  she needs more challenging work.  I would sit down with her and explain that I will be differentiating instruction to meet her higher level.  Because she is high-functioning academically, I have confidence that she can expect more out of herself.  (I would only make it a little bit more challenging).

If she continued to talk, I would first make sure that she understood the rule about talking in class (because I specifically taught it to the class, but it in the syllabus and asked her and her family to sign it) using an unobtrusive method.  Then, using guided choice, without using coercion to have students be accountable for their behavior.

Chapter:      11

Case Number and Title:    Case 4: Tom is Hostile and Defiant

Question:  Tom has appeared to be in his usual foul mood ever since arriving in class. On his way to sharpen his pencil, he bumps into Frank, who complains. Tom tells him loudly to shut up. Miss Baines, the teacher, says, “Tom, go back to your seat.” Tom wheels around, swears loudly, and says heatedly, “I’ll go when I’m damned good and ready!” How would Craig Seganti have Miss Baines deal with Tom?

Answer to question:

Seganti’s answer to this case would likely be very clear: “Tom, please return to your seat and see me for detention after school.”  In the event that Tom refused to comply, he would have administration remove him from the classroom and he would serve either a on-day suspension from his class or another consequence.

His procedures may appear strict because he holds students accountable for their actions, but Seganti contends that is exactly what hard-to-manage students need, and further, that the most positive thing you can do for students is give them access to a good education in a classroom focused on learning.

Your technique for student accountability:

If it is not a safety issue, requiring a more Glasser-type interruption, I would ask Tom to meet me at the door to interrupt and process his behavior.  After I felt that Tom was safe to return to the classroom (calm body, voice and a plan as to what he’s going to do), I will ask him to return to his seat and get back to the activity at hand.  If at any point I do not feel that a student is safe to be in class again, I will have administration remove the student and there will be processing and likely consequences after.

References:

Charles, C. Senter, G., Cook, P., VanWie, E., Brown, T. (2011). Building Classroom Discipline,  Tenth Edition. Pearson Education

CERTIFICATE OF ORIGINALITY

I certify that the attached paper is my original work. I am familiar with, and acknowledge my responsibilities which are part of, the University of Phoenix Student Code of Academic Integrity. I affirm that any section of the paper which has been submitted previously is attributed and cited as such, and that this paper has not been submitted by anyone else. I have identified the sources of all information whether quoted verbatim or paraphrased, all images, and all quotations with citations and reference listings. Along with citations and reference listings, I have used quotation marks to identify quotations of fewer than 40 words and have used block indentation for quotations of 40 or more words. Nothing in this assignment violates copyright, trademark, or other intellectual property laws. I further agree that my name typed on the line below is intended to have, and shall have, the same validity as my handwritten signature.

Student’s signature (name typed here is equivalent to a signature): John O. Reafleng

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