Classroom Management Class

Full Copy of Final Paper

EDU 547 Denise R., Instructor

Due and Submitted 5/18/14

 

(School Letter Head)

 

Dear Parents/Guardians,

My name is John Reafleng, and I am looking forward to teaching your child about all the wonderful aspects of reading this year! Reading is a fundamental skills that is essential for success in school, and I will be teaching  your son or daughter to be a better reader.  Please ask your child to share class expectations, classroom procedures, and grading information for this class with you. In this packet I am asking for your permission for your child to participate in three different activities throughout the year (outlined in this packet).

 

I believe that discipline and classroom management should be teacher-centered with the understanding that choice and rewards need to be given for students who are struggling in school, especially in Reading.  I allow student input into lessons, procedures and rules as the teacher feels appropriate and needed but I retain authority to make final decisions in all matters.  My goal is to encourage, motivate, effectively instruct and help students develop self-discipline.  Your support at home is critical to allow me to accomplish this.

 

In order to maintain this authority I may, on occasion, need to keep students after school.  During this time, I will help student understand the effects of their behavior on others, and teach them alternative ways to behave.  Usually this will be no more than 5 – 10 minutes, but will never last more than 15 min.  If your child has special transportation needs, please let me know so that arrangements can be made.

 

I will call you on occasion when you child is doing well in class – I want you to know when he or she is doing well.

 

The homework for this class is to read for 20 minutes 5 times per week.

 

Thank you for your time and willingness to better your child’s education. I am looking forward to working with your student to keep education cutting edge.  If you have any questions, please let me know.

 

Sincerely,

Mr. Reafleng

john.reafleng@unitedforsuccess.org

510 629 9665

 

 

Student Syllabus: Reading Class
2014-2015

Classroom Expectations

Be Responsible

Be Safe

Be Respectful

  • I  follow the directions of the teacher.
  • I keep all objects to myself.
  • I stay in my seat and the classroom unless the teacher have permission to leave.
  • I walk in the class and I watch my personal space.
  • I use positive language without yelling or provoking

These rules are clearly posted in the room for your child’s reference.  All students will be taught all expectations on the first day and throughout the entire first week.  This will be the only warning that students receive for any behavioral infractions.

 

 

Classroom Procedures

 

Turning in assignments and homework

The teacher will collect

 

Entering the Classroom

Students are expected to walk in the room calmly so that class can begin without delay.  Any student who does not walk in camly will be asked to leave and walk in again correctly.  When the students enter the classroom, please quietly grab the students Silent Sustained Reading (SSR) book and SSR journal, and begin reading for SSR time.

 

Tardies

At the middle school level, students walking in late almost always cause a distraction.  Unexcused tardies will result in the loss of citizenship points.  Students must sign in if they are late.

 

Dismissal from Class

Before the bell rings, the teacher will ask the students to clean up the students area. Please make sure all materials are put away in the correct place.  This is to show respect to our learning environment.

 

Restroom Policy

Students have a right to use the restroom if absolutely needed, however this right is often abused at the middle school level, distracting from learning. If a student needs to use the restroom, he or she will need to have a planner in order to fill out the students pass. A student may not leave while the teacher is giving directions or during the first/last ten minutes of class.  Students must sign-in and out when leaving the classroom.

 

Sharpening Pencils

To prevent distractions, the teacher will provide pencils if the students do not have one or if it needs sharpening.

 

Absent Work Policy

If the student is absent, don’t worry – the students have a chance to make up the students work!

 

 

Computer Work

At the middle school level, students often attempt to access websites other than the assigned ones.  This distracts from learning.  Students are expected to:

– Do the assigned program when it is assigned

– Stay at the students computer working quietly

– not have any other browser tab open

– If done early, inform the teacher:

 

SSR/Double-Entry Journal and Do Now

In order to start learning without any delay when class begins, students will read silently and complete their journal at their seats, or complete the Do Now as soon as they walk into the classroom.

 

Class Discussions

These discussions help share ideas and keep the students in the class connected to each other.  Students are expected to:

– Listen to one’s comments

– Take turns speaking

– Respect each others’ opinions.

 

Working with a Partner

Teamwork is an important life skill that is learned in school.

Students are expected to:

Stay with their partner

Speak in a normal to quiet voice

Work ONLY on the assigned activity

 

Prefered Activity Time

This is a reward for hard work in the class and is NOT to be expected all the time and is not for free-play.  It’s use is completely at the discretion of the teacher.

 

Classwork

This is what we will be doing most in the class, and is what will most benefit the students.  Students are expected to:

– Do the assigned work when is is assigned

– Stay in their seats working quietly

– Read a book or let the teacher know if done early

 

 

Working in Groups

Teamwork is an important life skill that is learned in school.  When working in groups, students are expected to:

Work only on the assignment

stay seated

Talk only about the assignments and in a normal indoor volume.

 

Attention Signal & Listening

The teacher cannot teach the class or give instructions for an activity unless the class is paying full attention to the teacher:

 

When the teacher has two-fingers in the air, or when anybody has the floor to speak, students have their eyes on the speaker, are in their seats and are not talking.  Students are to continue giving attention as instructions are given.

 

Safety

 

To keep the classroom safe, students are expected to keep to their own personal space, to use positive language without yelling, to keep all objects to themselves, to stay in their seat and classroom unless the student has permission to move around, and understand that horseplay, provoking and running in the class are not OK.

 

Following Instructions

 

Students are expected to understand that following instructions keep them safe in class (and at school) and allows them to learn.

 

Teacher-Directed Instruction

While teachers provide interesting learning activities that students can work on in groups on online, there are times when the teacher must provide direct instructions (which will never go on for more than 7 or 8 minutes.  During a teacher-directed lesson, students are expected to:

– follow directions,

– keep their eyes on the teacher,

– stay in their seats,

– be silent.

 

If students are talking or not paying attention, the teacher will use the attention-getting signal to get everyone’s attention before continuing the lesson.

Permissions:

 

BOOK PERMISSION:  My goal as your child’s teacher is to challenge him/her to critically analyze these texts in a mature fashion. I hope to expose your child to literature and themes that he/she may directly relate to in order to increase his/her appreciation for reading. With each novel that is presented in class, the material will be taught in a tasteful manner so that the goal of engaging your student without compromising the content of the novel is met.

 

If you feel that these novels may be inappropriate for your child, please indicate this on the permission slip below. If this option is chosen, I will choose an alternate book for your student to read that will cover the goals and standards for the unit.

 

 

CELL PHONE PERMISSION: Thanks to our school administration we have been granted permission to implement the use of cellphones in this class only. Cell phones are a powerful piece of technology that many students carry with them on a daily basis. The goal in testing this technology is to promote educational excellence by facilitating resource sharing, innovation, and communication. No cost should be incurred. Students will be grouped with others who have unlimited privileges on their phones, or students and parents who have indicated they may use a certain amount of their plans.

 

Your authorization is needed before your student may use his/her cell phone in this experiment. You and your student will also need to complete and return the cell phone plan survey located at the end of this packet. This way you and your student can both be clear on what his/her allowed usage is concerning: text messages, video or picture messages, usage minutes, apps and data plans. Only students with unlimited plans in the aforementioned areas will be utilizing those resources. If your student has an allotment of messages, data or minutes and you approve them to be used during this experiment, please indicate that on the survey. Usage outside of your student’s reading intervention class is NOT permitted.

 

*Please note: Students will never be asked to use their phone in class in a way that will incur charges for them or you.  However, if your student disobeys the rules set forth and do incur charges on their cell phone, the district, school, and teacher are not responsible for any costs that your student incurs while participating in this opportunity.

 

COMPUTER/INTERNET TOOLS PERMISSION: I am also asking for your permission to use computer/Internet technology in an innovative way this year. Throughout the year, I would like to utilize various Internet & Web 2.0 tools to enhance student learning. teachers will provide the students with lessons on responsible technology usage.

 

Examples of these tools can be found at the following websites. Please keep in mind more may be added throughout the year which are not listed below.

 

 

COMPUTER/INTERNET: Student Responsibilities and Expectations

 

  • Students will use the internet to research and complete projects pre-assigned by Ms. Mattingly.
  • Student use of the Internet will be monitored by OUSD’s filter, although it is ultimately the student’s responsibility to visit appropriate sites. Inappropriate sites are ones that are obscene, profane, advocate illegal acts, or discrimination.
  • Students may use their email account or other Web 2.0 tools for classroom purposes only.
  • Students must follow the OUSD Acceptable Use Policy. This is found on the main OUSD website. Please let me know if you need a copy.
  • No three identifying factors should be used for Internet projects. An example of a good username would be: School name, first name, last initial ONLY.

 

 

CELL PHONE: Student Responsibilities and Expectations

  • Unless you have been directly told by the teacher to use your cell phone or applications for a task, students agree to not text, make calls, use mobile internet, play games, turn on Bluetooth, take pictures and/or video, or utilize any other applications not mentioned above.
  • Students agree to abide by their cell phone plans and what was discussed with their parent(s)/guardian(s)
  • Students without unlimited texting will not be sending information unless parent has given permission.
  • Unless a student has a data plan, he/she will not access mobile web.
  • On days that cell phones are used in class, students will have their cell phones out on their desks in full view.

 

 

PERMISSION FORMS: RETURN TO Mr. Reafleng or the front office.

 

After reading the attached information, please fill out, sign and return the following pages. This is due back to school on (TBD)

**PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY**

 

STUDENT NAME: __________________________________________

 

PARENT NAME: ___________________________________________

 

PARENT PHONE NUMBER: ___________________________________

 

TODAY’S DATE: ______________

 

BOOK PERMISSION I give permission for my child to participate in the study/reading of adolescent-themed novels for the 2013-2014 school year.

(tbd)

PARENT/GUARDIAN SIGNATURE: _____________________________________________

CELL

PHONE

SURVEY

Please circle either yes or no for the questions below:

  • Is the student’s cell phone a “smart phone” that allows for downloading and running apps?

Yes             No

  • Is the student allowed to use unlimited minutes from your cell phone plan for class activities?

Yes             No (If no, how many minutes can the student use? ___)

  • Is the student allowed to send/receive unlimited text/picture messages from your cell phone plan for class activities?

Yes             No (If no, how many minutes can the student use? ___)

  • Can the student use his/her Internet in class with unlimited minutes (circle one)?

Yes               No

  • If the student has a smartphone or a phone that will allow it, can the student download and use free apps to his/her phone to allow him/her to participate in various 21st century activities for an unlimited time?

Yes             No

  • Are there other programs or capabilities not mentioned above, that if used in class for activities would cause a charge to your cell phone bill (circle one)?

Yes             No

  • If you answered “YES” to the above, please explain below:

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

CELL

PHONE PERMISSION

Please read carefully and check one:

______ DOES have permission to participate in the Cell Phones in the Classroom experiment and MAY USE his/her phone.

______ DOES have permission to participate in the Cell Phones in the Classroom experiment but MAY NOT use his/her phone.

______ DOES NOT have permission to participate in the Cell Phones in the Classroom experiment.

By signing this I acknowledge that I have read the Cell Phone AUP and worked with my student to fill out the Cell Phone survey.  I also acknowledge that I have read and understand the experiment parameters, including the fact that while no cost should be incurred, should my student not follow instructions and cost is incurred, the teacher, school and/or district are not responsible.

PARENT/GUARDIAN SIGNATURE: _____________________________________________

STUDENT SIGNATURE: _____________________________________________

TECHNOLOGY

PERMISSION

My child has permission to use the appropriate Web 2.0 tools outlined in the Technology Overview Letter. I understand that some Web 2.0 tools that are used for education purposes require an email for registration and log in. I give permission for my child to use his/her email for this purpose.

PARENT/GUARDIAN SIGNATURE: _____________________________________________

I have read the OUSD AUP (Acceptable Use Policy) and Student Responsibilities for using technology. I agree to productively use the computer, Internet, and Web 2.0 tools in a proper manner. I know if I do not follow the rules, then my privileges may be revoked and appropriate actions may be taken.

STUDENT SIGNATURE: _____________________________________________

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION If there is anything you think I should know as your child’s teacher, comments, questions, etc. please let me know below.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Citizenship, Rewards and Consequences

 

Students who have reading challenges tend to need more motivation to work and follow expectations.  To help them, the teacher will provide the following:

 

  • Earn outings to Library and museums for hard work and good behavior
  • Preferred Activity Time
  • Rewards Tickets (used in student store and raffle)
  • Specific praise or behavioral narration that includes statements about the appropriate behavior children displayed
  • Positive calls home

 

 

If students choose to not follow the Class Expectations, the following actions will take place:

 

➔  The student will be asked to do the behavior over again the correct way.  If it is not possible for the behavior to be done over respectfully, the students will be asked to do or say something positive in the classroom to make up for the behavior.

 

➔ If a student refuses to follow any direction, he or she will be asked to step outside the class to discuss the behavior.  Upon return, the student will be asked to do the behavior over in the correct way.

 

➔ If a student does any behavior that is a safety risk, sexual harassment, bullying or anything else that the teacher feels requires immediate time outside the classroom, the student will be asked to leave immediately.  This time may be right outside the door with the teacher, in the restorative justice room with a check-in or referral.

 

➔ The teacher may contact parents at any time during reasonable hours to report positive or negative behavior.

 

➔ If a student is asked if they are refusing to follow teacher directions, and he or she continues to not follow directions regardless of the answer, they will be asked to leave the classroom to a designated area and will receive a referral.  This may result in lunch or after-school detention or a suspension from the period.

 

➔ If a student earns a citizenship score of 2 (on a scale of 1 – 5) or less, they will need to serve a brief afterschool reflection time (never more than 15 min.).  Citizenship is based on following the classroom expectations

 

➔ *In the case of severe violations of classroom standards, the students will be removed immediately from the classroom and a discipline referral will be filed with administration.*

 

The teacher keeps a behavior board to track work completion and citizenship in case you have any questions about how your son or daughter is doing in class.

When the teacher speaks to a students about behavior, the classroom expectations will be clearly stated to the students.  The student may be asked to state the rule and write about why it is important.

The teacher will use a minimum of  three documents the students might use to hold themselves accountable.

 

 

Student Accountability Document 1

(to be used after school or at other appropriate times)

SSR – Eagle Expectations:

“I will read during SSR/Complete the Do Now at my seat silently .”

Discuss with teacher and write why this is important:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

 

Journal – Eagle Expectations:

“I will complete the journal entry for what I read for SSR.”

Discuss with teacher and write why this is important:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

 

 

Computer Activities – Eagle Expectations:

“I will do computer-based lessons, staying at my seat/computer working quietly with NO OTHER browser tab or application open.”

Discuss with teacher and write why this is important:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

 

Prefered Activity Time – Eagle Expectations:

“I understand that Prefered Activity Time is a reward for hard work in the class and is NOT to be expected all the time and is not for ‘free-play’.”

Discuss with teacher and write why this is important:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

 

 

Attention Signal & Listening – Eagle Expectations:

“When the teacher has two-fingers in the air, I have my eyes on the speaker, am in my seat and not talking.”

Discuss with teacher and write why this is important:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

 

Classwork – Eagle Expectations:

“I will do the assigned work when it is given to me and I will stay in my seat and work quietly.”

Discuss with teacher and write why this is important:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

 

 

Following Instructions – Eagle Expectations:

“I understand that following instructions keep me and other students safe at school and lets us learn.”

Discuss with teacher and write why this is important:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

 

 

Safety – Eagle Expectations:

To keep the classroom safe, I keep to my own personal space, I use positive language without yelling, I keep all objects to myself, I stay in my seat and classroom unless I have permission to move around, I know that horseplay, provoking and running in the class are not OK.”

Discuss with teacher and write why this is important:

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________

 

Student Accountability Document 2

This document, unavailable for reproduction here, is a slip the size of a standard flashcard that is used to allow the student to take a break or check-in with a staff at a designated location.  It is not a punishment per se, but  chance for student to reflect upon their behavior.  This is used in conjunction with the consequences section listed above.

Student Accountability Document 3

This document is to process a more severe incident that may involve a referral.  The document is based on a restorative justice practice, and is proprietary to the school, and has therefore not been included.  The document asks the student to state what happened, what effect the behavior had on others and proceeds to walk the student(s) through a restorative justice process.

 

 

Sample Lesson Plans

 

Learning Targets:

1.  Students will read and comprehend a text.

2.  Students will use sounds to spell unknown or irregular words.

 

Agenda/Activities:

 

  1. 1.  SSR (10 min.) Find a book, magazine or article online (desktop, chromebook or smartphone)
  2. 2.  Journal (2-3 min.) – see back of this page.

 

or

  1. 3.  Do Now (5 min.) – standards-based activity to support reading activity, scaffolded for universal access to be reviewed.
  2. 4.  Reading Activity (10 – 20 min.)

 

a.  Hook

b.  Purpose/connection to student life

 

and/or

  1. 5. Acheive3000/Writing (10 min.) – show the teacher each lesson!!  Write at least three sentences for the Thought Question.

and/or

 

  1. 6. Special Projects (time varies)
  2.   PAT if EVERYTHING is done (5 – 10 min)

 

Journal

  1.  What did the main character do in what you read?  Where did the story take place? (2 complete sentence)

_________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

 

  1.  How did you feel about it and explain why you feel this way? (1 complete sentence)

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

 

 

A graphic representation of the teacher’s classroom setup

 

(see attached)

 

 

Students will use desks to allow for greater flexibility in creating either separation or strategic groupings.  The middle row was created to allow for student sitting near the projector to see, and maintain symmetry in desk groupings.  I would like to switch the books for ssr with the computers to allow students to get a book the moment that they walk in.  I am awaiting a technology request to do this.  I am also trying to get my projector setup fixed so that I do need to create a station in front of student desks.

 

 

 

 

“Find your discipline mode or style, implement it promptly and consistently. Do what works for you. And if it doesn’t work, try something else.” – University of Phoenix student

 

Classroom Rules Challenges for Students and Positive Solutions

 

Behavior Scenario

Positive Communication Possible Effect Rationale
not following the directions of the teacher. A student has been asked to stop talking to a neighbor and get to work on the Do Now Teacher will provide behavioral narration for students sitting near the student prior to any consequence being given to the student. Student will likely comply if those around him or her do. Canter (2011) states that students want to be acknowledged for their efforts and will work accordingly.
I keep all objects to myself. Student has thrown something and has been asked to pick it up. none after student picks up item and puts in in correct place, will have a conversation outside. Throwing of objects in a non-negotiable in my class.
I stay in my seat and the classroom unless the teacher have permission to leave. A student has been asked to return to their seat after getting up to look out the window. Prior to any consequences being given, Reward Tickets will be given to everybody that is in their seats, coupled with behavioral narration. Student will likely comply Student will see that others are being rewarded for positive behaviors and will want to receive the same reward (though they likely may not receive it)
not watching the personal space of others.. A student has been asked to redo an action w/o violating the personal space of another student. The offended student will be given reward tickets for not reacting to the provocation. Student will likely comply When the offending student no longer has an audience, the behavior will likely cease.
Using inappropriate language or provoking others A student has been re-directed to use appropriate words. “I would like to thank the students who are choosing to use the correct way to say things in the classroom” Student will likely comply Students wants the prize being given to other students.

 

 

Common Challenges for Students and Possible Solutions

 

May not understand what is expected of them more checks for understanding, significantly shorten number of directions given prior to student work, shorter student tasks, ensure that all students have teacher’s attention during instructions
motivation to learn discuss the purpose of each lesson and how it pertains to the students’ lives.
respect avoid sarcasm, don’t raise voice at students, avoid punitive discipline or any actions that appear arbitrary
Association be purposeful in student groupings and allow for choice as a reward
make the student s feel that they have a home while in the students class.
Enjoyment provide engaging, multi-media lessons (but don’t rely on multi-media exclusively)
Power school to provide on-going PDs on classroom management; school-wide discipline/reward plans, individual teachers to pursue advanced studies in classroom management
continued studies in their subject area, chances to collaborate with peers at other schools/districts in their subject area.
Students restless during instruction direct instruction should go on no longer than 7 – 8 min.
Students with learning challenges may isolate themselves, afraid that others will see their work. scaffold work, provide small opportunities for success.
Many students are off task Make a list ahead of time of effective praise statements that can be provided to the children.
Individual students need help Get all students on task before helping individual students. “When the teacher sees everybody working the teacher will be right there to help the students.”
Student often violates the rule of using appropriate language. compile a list of quotes that the student can use as substitutes for the inappropriate vocabulary
Many students are off task Praise should be contingent upon a desired behavior; that is, it should be provided

immediately following the behavior

Many students are off task Make a list of four target behaviors that will elicit praise statements for these children.
A student has a significant challenge with following the classroom rules Make a chart of the challenging behaviors that these students display and the desired replacement behaviors that are in the children’s repertoire.
Students get done early the teacher will provide students private journals that they can write in during any downtime.
Students try to get ‘free-time’ that they have not earned. the teacher will  set very clear expectations so that students know when it is work time, and when it is game time (with as much PAT as possible).
Students say that they don’t know what to do the teacher will Focus MUCH more on procedures; procedures that work for me and the students and be consistent with them.  This will include being mindful of maximizing instructional time.
The teacher is tired of talking to students about discipline the teacher will think more about what the teacher is going to say – use body language and proximity more
Entire class is having trouble staying on task. PAT will be used to reinforce class and individual behavior – the teacher will use free (appropriate) choice when the teacher feels that it’s been earned.
Individual students may have suffered trauma explore more the idea of linking lessons to basic needs of students
Students claim that a particular consequence isn’t fair. Students are to know in advance what behaviors will result in a consequence,
Students say (or show) that they are bored. ]better activate internal motivation of students (with specific strategies)
Students want a reward that is outside of the norm, or want to avoid a consequence Use this as an opportunity to develop teacher leverage
A student chronically misbehaves Begin and continue a paper trail for this student.
Students seem lost during instruction, or when it’s time to get to work. the teacher will implement Jones’ “Say, See, Do” and teacher output/student input (repeat) teaching processes
Students are talking while teacher gives directions the teacher will make sure that the teacher has students’ full attention when giving directions or teaching
Students are talking while teacher gives directions the teacher will think about appropriate strategies to get my students quiet when needed.
Teacher gives repeated warnings to students and then effects consequences inconsistently. the teacher will spend less time discussing discipline instead of implementing due process and appropriate and disclosed consequences.
Individual Student has trouble following rules explain rules in terms of specific actions and give examples.  i.e. “keeping objects to ourselves means walking over to the trash can and throwing something away.”
students don’t, or claim to not  understand the consequences for breaking rules Refer to rules constantly
Students are late Discuss the importance of being on time, now and for later in their school/work career
Students are engaged in multiple websites/electronic devices during a learning activity. teach students to block out interruptions
Students often become off-task after instructions have been given. w/in two seconds of giving a directions, begin behavioral narration.

Describe the behavior of at least three students (especially historically non-compliant students when they are on task, Use EVERY TIME directions are given.

Students are getting off task after I give directions. Within 10 seconds after you give directions, correct off-task, disruptive behavior of students.
A student is having a ‘meltdown’ Ask students “What is it that you need right now?”  “Is there another way to get your needs met right now?”
Teacher feels overwhelmed “Do I need to change the classroom rules to address student misbehavior?”

Are the corrective actions appropriate?  Do they need to be changed?

Ar my positive feedback/reward strategies effective?

 

 

 

Creating More Engaging Lessons

 

Every lesson should start with a hook and a brief discussion as to how it connects to the lives of students.  The trick is to find different ways for diverse students to connect to and interact with the learning experience.
Students can show comprehension by creating their own text to include their own original ideas: drawing,, maps, illustrations, comics, recordings etc.
Once a week students will be given a journal topic about areas of interest to them.  2 or 3 topics would be given based on what the teacher thinks my diverse learners groups would be into – about ten minutes to write down our thoughts on it.  We could the discuss it and tie it in to the essential question of the unit.
the teacher will incorporate art into aspect of the curriculum.  the teacher plan to use more illustrations and hands-on games that the students find challenging (i.e. more puzzles that kids like that support learning targets) and well-scaffolded multi-media projects that meet specific learning targets.
the teacher will build into my curriculum solid (light) objects that are passed around to share and discuss stories for a more kinesthetic experience.
the teacher will play music when kids come in and during independent activities.
the teacher will develop an e-mail presence with my students.
the teacher will look at using Edmodo, a safe social networking for schools very similar to facebook
the teacher will continue to provide core content via computers in spite of students’ reluctance to use it for academic reasons.
the teacher will create a curriculum-based investigation/mystery so that the students will be interested in the challenge.
the teacher will also use Quizlet in order to help students memorize vocabulary lists. They can work on this individually, in small groups or as a class.
Jones states that engaging lessons will reduce most behavioral challenges.  My lessons will

– be visually auditorily stimulating

– will address multiple intelligences/learning styles

– will involve competition

– will have (structured) rewards for completion

– will be organized and carried out as flawlessly as possible

– will encourage the more marginalized students to participate

webquests, which are great for frontloading, and many video clips

 

 

First Week of School – Teaching Procedures and Expectations

 

Conducting lessons on appropriate behavior

 

Effective teachers know that their number one priority is to take the time and effort to systematically teach students their expectation for how they are to successfully behave in all classroom activities.

 

The specific activities and situations in each period can be included in three broad categories:

1.  Instructional Activities: “What are the instructional activities in my class?”

2.  Procedures: “What are ALL the procedures in the class?”

3.  Policies:  “What are the behavioral expectation policies that are measurable?”

 

Effective teachers teach their students responsible behavior in the same manner as they would any academic subject.  Each activity should have only three behaviors to teach.  These activities should include behavior related to inappropriate student talking, movement and lack of participation, given that these comprise 90% of disruptive behavior.  Lessons run for 5 – 10 min.

 

 

Format:

 

1.  Introduce the lesson

“We do many types of activities in our class.  One of them is the teacher giving instructions or giving a short lesson, which will almost never be more than 5 – 7 min. at a time.  Why do you think that is important?”

 

2.  Teach behavior

“For students to be successful during instruction, it is important sit quietly at your desk, focus on the teacher without talking.”

 

3.  Model the behavior

“Let’s see how well some of you can act out what you’ve learned about being successful during lessons.”  Pic 2 – 3 students to model and have a student be the teacher.  First have the students be off task, then have them be on task.  May have students with behavioral challenges act as “teacher”

 

4.  Check for understanding

One reason students have trouble learning behavioral expectations is that they may not fully understand what they are expectd to do.  Ask students to repeat back the instructions: “Who can tell me one way to be successful during instruction time?”  Have students signal to you that they understand the behavior “words, head nod or thumbs up.  “In your own words, tell me how I expect you to behave during instruction”

(the scripts change depending on the behavior being taught – talk about specific behaviors from classroom rules).

 

Developing a curriculum on any topic, including behavior, begins with determining what you want the students to know and be able to do.

 

 

SAMPLE 2-WEEK Responsible Behavior Curriculum

 

DAY 1

 

Focus on activities that are of basic importance to you and your students right now. You need

to get and hold their attention right away for these basic activities. Teaching your students

the behavior you expect during less critical activities such as how to behave during an

assembly can wait until later.

 

 

TOPIC: TEACHING STUDENTS TO PAY ATTENTION

Students need to learn to give you their attention immediately. They also need to learn

to be active listeners whenever you are speaking.

 

Attention Signal & Listening

The teacher cannot teach the class or give instructions for an activity unless the class is paying full attention to the teacher:

 

When the teacher has two-fingers in the air, or when anybody has the floor to speak, students have their eyes on the speaker, are in their seats and are not talking.  Students are to continue giving attention as instructions are given.

 

 

  • Attention-Getting Signal: this should be one of the first lessons you teach on the first day of school.  For high school, the classic two-fingers together is probably best.  Expect 100% compliance.  Narrate compliance: “I see that Chandra has her eyes on me, is in her seat and not talking.”  Correct any students who are off task.  Model per the previous activity.
  • Teacher-Directed Instruction

 

During a teacher-directed lesson, students are expected to: follow directions, keep their eyes on the teacher, stay in their seats, do this w/o talking.  DO NOT WAIT FOR STUDENTS TO BE QUIET!  This wastes time.  Use the attention-getting signal.  Do not “Shh” students – take your corrective action.  Do not let talking get out of hand.  If for any reason during the lesson more than five students are talking (for our SDC classes, fewer) or not paying attention, use your attention-getting signal to get everyone’s attention before continuing the lesson.  Make sure you never lecture for more than 7 – 8 minutes (for Sped, less time) w/o some form of engagement strategy to involve all the students in the lesson.  One idea of engagement strategy from book that may be appropriate for sped: “Stop and Jot”.  Have students listen carefully w/o taking notes.  After a short time stop and give them 1 – 2 minutes to recall as much information as they can from the presentation.  Shape the notes with them by guiding them through key points.  this reconstruction of learning helps with mastering both facts and concepts.

 

 

TOPIC: CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT PLAN

Teaching students your general classroom rules is an important responsibility on the first

day of school.

 

  • Classroom Rules

Students need to be taught basic expectations as to how they should behave in your classroom.  These expectations are called classroom rules.  These rules are in effect at all times and help ensure that our classroom is a safe environment where I can teach and you can learn.

 

Current Rules

( see above)

 

Rules need to be observable.  Rules need to be able to be applicable no matter what the learning activity or classroom situation is.

 

Teach the rules to students (find activities to teach the rules)

 

Send copy of rules to parents

 

Change rules if needed

 

When students choose to break a rule, they also choose to accept a corrective action.

 

Remind students that rules are in effect at all times.  Refer back to rules continuously throughout the period.  When a new student enters the class, use the opportunity to review the classroom rules for all students.

 

Safety

 

To keep the classroom safe, students are expected to keep to their own personal space, to use positive language without yelling, to keep all objects to themselves, to stay in their seat and classroom unless the student has permission to move around, and understand that horseplay, provoking and running in the class are not OK.

 

Following Instructions

 

Students are expected to understand that following instructions keep them safe in class (and at school) and allows them to learn.

 

Entering the Classroom

Students are expected to walk in the room calmly so that class can begin without delay.  Any student who does not walk in camly will be asked to leave and walk in again correctly.  When the students enter the classroom, please quietly grab the students Silent Sustained Reading (SSR) book and SSR journal, and begin reading for SSR time.

 

 

Teacher-Directed Instruction

While teachers provide interesting learning activities that students can work on in groups on online, there are times when the teacher must provide direct instructions (which will never go on for more than 5 or 6 minutes.  During a teacher-directed lesson, students are expected to:

– follow directions,

– keep their eyes on the teacher,

– stay in their seats,

– be silent.

 

If students are talking or not paying attention, the teacher will use the attention-getting signal to get everyone’s attention before continuing the lesson

 

Tardies

At the middle school level, students walking in late almost always cause a distraction.  Unexcused tardies will result in the loss of citizenship points.  Students must sign in if they are late.

 

Restroom Policy

Students have a right to use the restroom if absolutely needed, however this right is often abused at the middle school level, distracting from learning. If a student needs to use the restroom, he or she will need to have a planner in order to fill out the students pass. A student may not leave while the teacher is giving directions or during the first/last ten minutes of class.  Students must sign-in and out when leaving the classroom.

 

Sharpening Pencils

To prevent distractions, the teacher will provide pencils if the students do not have one or if it needs sharpening.

 

Absent Work Policy

If the student is absent, don’t worry – the students have a chance to make up the students work!

 

  • Positive Feedback

some types of feedback appropriate for HS: individual positive feedback, positive calls home, class-wide positive feedback, points system.

 

Tell students how you will provide positive feedback above.

 

Post how you will provide positive feedback in the classroom.

 

Recognize every student every day in a positive way.

 

Make positive contact with the family of at least two students every week

 

 

  • Corrective Actions

 

Without a corrective action policy, you will be forced to constantly make choices about how to react.  These on-the-spot responses are often arbitrary, inconsistent and based upon emotion.

 

Students have a right to know that they will be treated fairly when they misbehave.  A set policy gives all students a clear picture of the corrective actions they can expect you will take.

 

The goal of corrective action is not to punish students.  You would never punish a student for a mistake in reading or math, so why would you punish a student when he or she misbehaves.  Effective corrective actions are designed to help teach students appropriate behavior.  It is the inevitability of the corrective action and not the severity that makes it effective.

 

Some examples: ()

 

Corrective actions should be consistently applied.  Give a copy of your discipline procedures to admin./deans.

 

Be prepared for students to test you.

 

 

TOPIC: STUDENT COMFORT AND SAFETY ISSUES

Students need to have their comfort issues addressed. You must also teach emergency

 

  • Individual Students Leaving Class to Go to the Restroom/drinking fountain, – must get a pass.
  • Emergency Drills

 

Never let a student be the last one to leave during a drill or emergency.  Have emergency contact not available.

Give directions to students: “Walk slowly and calmly in a group w/o getting ahead or falling behind the other group members.  If anybody does not comply we will need to stop and regroup.  This is a safety issue and you are expected to comply.”

 

 

TOPIC: ENDING THE DAY OR PERIOD AND LEAVING THE CLASSROOM

Students will need to be taught your end of the day procedures and how to leave the

 

  • End of the Day or Period Routine, page 195

Students need to end the period in a calm, structured manner w/ plenty of time to clean up and organize their materials.  Students (and teacher) need to be taught how to end the period in a  calm, constructive manner.  This can be best accomplished by allowing enough time and the end of the period.

 

Dismissal from Class

Before the bell rings, the teacher will ask the students to clean up the students area. Please make sure all materials are put away in the correct place.  This is to show respect to our learning environment.

 

Say goodbye to all students by name.

 

 

DAY 2

 

Now you will begin prioritizing behavioral expectations for other activities. Be sure to review

all lessons taught the previous day to reinforce student learning.

 

TOPIC: INTRODUCE YOUR PROCEDURES FOR THE BEGINNING OF THE DAY OR PERIOD

 

The first day is usually too hectic to teach this lesson. Teaching it on the second day is very

important. You will want to teach the initial procedures first and then add more

procedures on later days.

 

  • Beginning of the Day or Period Routine

Greet each student as they enter the door.

 

Start the Do Now by getting the activity, sitting down quietly and working on it w/o engaging with peers.

 

Restroom Policy

Students have a right to use the restroom if absolutely needed, however this right is often abused at the middle school level, distracting from learning. If a student needs to use the restroom, he or she will need to have a planner in order to fill out the students pass. A student may not leave while the teacher is giving directions or during the first/last ten minutes of class.  Students must sign-in and out when leaving the classroom.

 

Sharpening Pencils

To prevent distractions, the teacher will provide pencils if the students do not have one or if it needs sharpening.

 

Turning in assignments and homework

The teacher will collect

 

SSR/Double-Entry Journal and Do Now

In order to start learning without any delay when class begins, students will read silently and complete their journal at their seats, or complete the Do Now as soon as they walk into the classroom.

 

Prefered Activity Time

This is a reward for hard work in the class and is NOT to be expected all the time and is not for free-play.  It’s use is completely at the discretion of the teacher.

 

Classwork

This is what we will be doing most in the class, and is what will most benefit the students.  Students are expected to:

– Do the assigned work when is is assigned

– Stay in their seats working quietly

– Read a book or let the teacher know if done early

 

TOPIC: INDEPENDENT WORK

Learning to work independently is a fundamental skill that must be mastered before less

teacher-directed instructional settings are attempted. Along with this instructional

activity, you may also want to teach procedures that are often related to independent

work, such as handling materials and in-seat transitions.

 

  • Independent Work (SSR, etc.)

During independent work, students are expected to:

Do the assigned work when is is assigned

Stay in their seats working quietly

Read a book or let the teacher know if done early

 

Get all students on task before helping individual students. “When I see everybody working I will be right there to help you.”

 

If students start talking, immediately narrate the behaviors of the on-task students.  If this is not effective, approach the students who are still talking and correct their behavior (consider taking conversation outside if large number of students are talking).  “Can we take this conversation outside?”

 

Watch for pseudo-compliance

 

Off-task behavior often occurs when students do not understand how to do the work or when the assignments are too challenging or not challenging enough.

 

Let the students know you will be checking their work.  Help students see and understand exactly what they can do to improve their learning.  

 

Use praise, prompt and leave method.

Praise:  comment on any part of the assignment the students have done correctly.

Prompt:  direct the student to the next thing they need to do.  quickly check for

Leave:  When you think they got, leave.

 

Tell students what to do if they finish early.  i.e. Silent reading, extra credit activity, fill work, work on vocabulary.

 

 

  • In-Seat Transitions, page 163

When students are asked to clear their desks for a new activity, students will:

put away materials in a timely manner

stay seated (unless putting materials away)

Wait for instruction

Do this w/o talking

 

Make sure that students have all the materials they need for the next activity

Make sure that teacher is ready for the next activity!

Do not be distracted by student questions or comments during transitions.

Have a plan for students how forget materials (i.e. “I can’t find my binder).

Give a 2 min warning that an activity is about to end.

 

 

DAY 3

 

Review all lessons taught the previous 2 days as students engage in the activities again.

 

 

TOPIC: GROUP DISCUSSIONS

 

Class Discussions

These discussions help share ideas and keep the students in the class connected to each other.  Students are expected to:

– Listen to one’s comments

– Take turns speaking

– Respect each others’ opinions.

This is a step down from the highly structured, teacher-directed, independent-work activity.

In the following lesson, students will be taught how to participate in a discussion.

 

  • Whole-Class Discussion

To be successful during whole-class discussions, students must learn to participate appropriately: listen to one’s comments, take turns speaking, respect each others’ opinions.  Discussions can quickly fall apart when students blurt out answers, monopolize the conversation, avoid participating, ask irrelevant questions or give inappropriate answers.

 

Only call on students who quietly raise their hands

 

Take corrective action if students continue to shout out answers

 

Use physical proximity to keep students engaged (move around the room and briefly stand next to unengaged students).

 

Keep all students engaged in the discussion (names on Popsicle sticks, tally sheet for students who participate, avoid calling on first students who raise their hands.  Use ‘wait’ time.  After posing a question, allow at least 5 seconds for students to process it and formulate an answer.  Use higher-level questions.  Ask questions that cause students to build, combine, synthesize and extend their learning, i.e. ‘what do you think, how does this relate to what we already know.  How is that different, why do you think this might be?”

 

For older students, try having students simply speak one at a time w/o raising hands (if they are proficient w/ discussions.)

 

 

TOPIC: USE OF CLASSROOM SPACE

When students start moving around the room, they need to know your expectations for

using different areas of the classroom, including their own desks and yours.

 

Computer Work

At the middle school level, students often attempt to access websites other than the assigned ones.  This distracts from learning.  Students are expected to:

– Do the assigned program when it is assigned

– Stay at the students computer working quietly

– not have any other browser tab open

– If done early, inform the teacher:

 

  • Taking Care of Computers (tbd)
  • At the end of the period put all items where they belong.

 

 

DAY 4

 

The lessons suggested for the first days of school focus largely on individual student

responsibilities. Now you can begin to teach your expectations for more complex activities

where students need to demonstrate responsible behavior in situations with less teacher-directed activity.

 

TOPIC: WORKING WITH A PARTNER

 

Working with a Partner

Teamwork is an important life skill that is learned in school.

Students are expected to:

Stay with their partner

Speak in a normal to quiet voice

Work ONLY on the assigned activity

 

Working in pairs is the most structured learning activity that involves students working

together. Students need to learn how to work with one other student before they are

asked to work in a group.

 

  • Working With a Partner

Teamwork is an important life skill that is learned in school.

 

Pairing off:

When moving into pairs, students will:

move quickly to sit next to their partner

Speak in a quiet voice

 

working with a partner:

When working with a partner, students will:

stay with their partner

speak in a quiet voice

work ONLY on the assigned activity

 

First have students pair off and then give them instructions.  Have partners ask each other what the directions are.

 

When students are working in pairs, let nothing distract you from monitoring their behavior and narrating or correcting it.

 

Monitor student conversations to make sure all students are making productive use of their time.

 

Avoid partnering w/ students.

 

Give a heads-up to students who have trouble working with classmates (pull them aside and encourage him or her to display prosocial behavior – need more on this!)

 

Specific social skills needed to work with a partner

be a good listener

Give compliments

Express disagreements (ej. “I don’t think that will work, what do you think about _________”

Take turns and share

 

Utilize different methods to pair off students.

 

 

Depending on your own classroom situation, it may be appropriate to teach these lessons in

future weeks when the students are prepared for more independent activities.

 

 

DAY 5

 

Review lessons from the previous 2 days, but also make sure that students continue to meet

the expectations taught during the first days of school.

 

TOPIC: WORKING IN COOPERATIVE GROUPS

 

Working in Groups

Teamwork is an important life skill that is learned in school.  When working in groups, students are expected to:

Work only on the assignment

stay seated

Talk only about the assignments and in a normal indoor volume.

 

Cooperative group activities should be taught only after students have learned how to pay

attention, work with a partner, move around the room, and get and use materials. Do not

attempt these activities until you are sure they have learned how to behave in other less

teacher-directed activities. Working in cooperative groups is a highly complex activity. Start

slowly, focusing first on transitioning to the group and then on behaving within the group.

 

  • Working in Groups

Working in groups is an important life skill that is learned in school.

 

When working in groups, students will:

Work only on the assignment

stay seated

Talk only about the assignments and in a normal indoor volume.

 

Do not attempt to have students work in groups unless they have demonstrated the ability to get and stay on task during independent work and partner activities.

 

When students are first put into groups, make sure the activity they engage in can be finished in a few minutes – quit at the height of engagement.

 

Narrate during group work “The students in the group by the window are all working on the assignment using a normal indoor volume.”, etc.

 

Use signal if noise level becomes too high.

 

Carefully explain group assignments: state the purpose (AIM) of the assignment and what the group’s academic responsibility is.

 

Have all students make different contributions to the final product.  Detail your criteria for success.

 

*Attached, ppt slides that contain the lessons to teach the above

 

 

Rules and Procedures Assessment

Notes:

 

Student Name: Period: __________

 

 

1st date:_______ 2nd date:_______ 3rd date:_______ 4th date:_______

 

TEACHING RESPONSIBLE BEHAVIOR LESSON CHECKLIST (adapted from Classroom Success for Classroom Management)

 

Instructional Settings Lessons

. Teacher-Directed Instruction    ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered  

. Whole-Class Discussion        ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Independent Work                   ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Working With a Partner          ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Working in Groups                  ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

 

 

Procedures Lessons

. Attention-Getting Signal   ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

Turning in assignments

. Distributing and Collecting Materials ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Emergency Drills ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

Entering the Classroom ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

Dismissal from Class ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Taking Care of Desks, Tables, and Chairs ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Making Up Missed Work Due to Absence ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Sharpening Pencils ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

Tardies

Safety

Computer Work

SSR/Double-Entry Journal and Do Now

Prefered Activity Time

Classwork

Following Instructions

Policies Lessons

. Classroom Rules ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Positive Feedback ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Corrective Actions ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

. Individual Students Leaving Class to Go to the Restroom/using the Drinking Fountain

                                                               ❏  ❏  ❏  Continue Instruction       ❏ Mastered

 

 

Before First Day:

1. What are my rules? Why do they exist?  How will the teacher teach the rules?

“Rules are important in our daily lives. We have rules for driving, rules for studying, and even rules for playing. Think about the rules the students have in the students school and in the students community. What three rules should every school and community have?”

 

____________________________________________________________________

2. What will be my plan to stay cool?

 

_____________________________________________________________________

4. What are all of my positive strategies?

 

_____________________________________________________________________

5. How will the teacher consistently enforce rules?

 

____________________________________________________________________

6. What are my procedures?

 

____________________________________________________________________

7. How are the procedures published to the students?

 

____________________________________________________________________

 

8. What will the consequences be for rule/procedure violations?

 

____________________________________________________________________

9. Is my procedures lesson plan for the first week ready? _____

10. Is everything in my syllabus? _______

11. When the teachers takes students outside to discuss behavior what will be talked about what will be the script

 

_____________________________________________________________________

12. Have the teacher set up classroom jobs/duties: librarian, tech manager, and attendance-taker? _____

13. the teacher has a sign out for bathroom and late arrivals? _____

 

 

Notes:

 

 

Before Every Lesson  –  Date: ______

 

1. What will be my plan to stay cool?

_____________________________________________________________________

 

2. Do the teacher have all needed materials?

____________________________________________________________________

 

3. How have the teachercreated engaging lessons?

_____________________________________________________________________

 

4. What student materials do the teachers needs?  Are they ready?

___________________________________________________________________

 

5. How will my lessons activate internal motivation?

_____________________________________________________________________

 

6. How are my lessons meeting the basic needs of my troubled and/or traumatized students?

_____________________________________________________________________

 

7. What are items that the teacher can let my students help me with in terms of lesson components?

_____________________________________________________________________

 

8. What will the teacher do to energize the class?

_____________________________________________________________________

 

9. What will the teacher do to build classroom community?

____________________________________________________________________

 

10. What is my plan when the teacher needs to get kids quiet? What if they don’t comply? How will the teacher follow through?

_____________________________________________________________________

 

11. Have the teacher double-checked everything? _____

 

 

Notes:

During the Lesson  –  Date: ______

1. Am the teacher exploiting my teacher leverage right now?

 

2. Am the teacher holding my audience? How? Is it time to abandon the activity for something else?

 

3. Am the teacher constantly asking for and checking for compliance?

 

4. Am the teacher mindful of where the teacher put my materials?

 

5. Am the teacher letting my students know that the teacher is enjoy working with them? _____

 

6. Am the teacher bargaining or arguing with my students? _____

 

7. Am the teacher being mindful of my proximity, body language and words? _____

 

8. Am the teacher providing behavioral narration (instead of excessive praise)? _____

 

9. Am providing reward tokens? _____

 

10. Am the teacher following see, say, do? _____

 

 

11. Am the teacher referring back to the rules constantly? _____

 

 

12. Am the teacher recognizing all my students in a positive way? _____

 

 

13. Am the teacher staying cool and not getting into power struggles? _____

 

 

Notes:

 

 


After Each lesson  –  Date: ______

 

1. How many warnings did the teacher give? _____

 

2. How many times did the teacher send a student out? _____

 

3. Did the teacher write referrals for students who needed them? _____

 

4. Did the teacher maximize the amount of PAT used for curriculum-relevant purposes?  For next time?

 

_____________________________________________________________________

 

5. Did the teacher push my students as far as the teacher reasonably could have? What can the teacher do next time?

 

_____________________________________________________________________

 

6. Did the teachers teach from the syllabus/learning targets? What is missing?

 

_____________________________________________________________________

 

7. Has the teacher called parents for positive referrals? _____

 

 

References:

 

Charles, C. Senter, G., Cook, P., VanWie, E., Brown, T. (2011). Building Classroom Discipline,  Tenth Edition. Pearson Education

 

Canter, L. (2010). Classroom Management for Academic Success, Solution Tree

 

 

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